Science Literacy

      

     According to the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996), scientific literacy is defined as, "the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs, and economic productivity"

 The following are examples of what a scientific literate person can know and be able to do
according to the NSES and  examples of how literacy is addressed in class.

(NSES)
Act and find answers to questions arising from their own curiosity

(Class)
Students will often explore their own curiosities about the world around them. This curiosity helps them relate science concepts that are being discussed in class with what they may already know or have experienced.   By sharing their ideas and questions  with others greater understanding can be had by all.

(NSES)
Explain and predict natural phenomena

(Class)
Students will research and investigate many of Earth's processes. Although many of these processes may seem at first glance to be catastrophic, they will learn that these processes are vital to our planet's continuance.From earthquakes to storms, students will learn how inter-connected these processes are and how important it is for us to gain understanding of them.

(NSES)
Read, understand, and be able to discuss articles about science in popular media

Use evidence and data to evaluate the quality of science information and arguments put forth by scientists and in the media.

(Class)
Every term students will find a current event article about a science event from the past year.  They are encouraged to focus on an area of science they find interesting.
 Using an outline they then respond to the article and address points of concern or interest from many different angles.

(NSES)
Identify scientific issues underlying matters requiring national and local decisions


(Class)
Direct and indirect effects of natural disasters seem to dominate our news lately.  Students relate these events to communities on local, national and global levels. Along with natural disasters we also study the effects of changes on ecosystems.